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Take A Virtual Vacation To Experience The Beauty and Culture of Puerto Rico this Weekend

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We could all use a weekend getaway right now.

Salsa music, dancing, mixology and cuisine — what else could possibly sound better? And though that may happen physically for quite some time, thanks to technology, we can all make plans to be in Puerto Rico as early as this weekend.

The beautiful people of Puerto Rico have graciously extended an invitation for people everywhere to escape to the island this weekend — virtually. And because we all need to be uplifted during these challenging times, it may end up being just the cure that the doctor ordered. 

From March 27 – 29, you’ll be able to learn to salsa, make delicious cocktails, and enjoy a cooking demo hosted by Puerto Rican talent – the first virtual weekend escape being offered by a destination.

Here’s the incredible lineup of events that you can join.

Friday, March 27

From 8:00 – 9:00 PM ET you’ll be immersed in Puerto Rican culture by taking salsa lessons directly from choreographer to the stars, Tito Ortos and his partner Tamara. As the Director of the San Juan City Salsa Dance Program, Tito participates with Tamara every year in congresses around the world and both work as judges for the World Salsa Summit, Euroson Latino and the World Salsa Championships.

Saturday, March 28 

We all sure could use a cocktail right now, couldn’t we? Thankfully during this class you can imagine yourself on a beach sipping delicious cocktails while you learn from Roberto Berdecia, bartender and co-founder of the famous La Factoría at 7:00PM ET. La Factoría in Old San Juan, celebrating its fifth year as one of the World’s 50 Best Bars and featured in the music video of the hit song, Despacito, offers incredible cocktails harnessing local flavors, some of the best hospitality on the Island and an authentic atmosphere that seeps out of the distinguished bar walls.

Sunday, March 29 

Empanadillas, pasteles, mofongo… oh my. During this cooking demo from 7:00 – 7:30 PM ET,  Puerto Rico chef, of Wilo Benet from Wilo Eatery & Bar, will teach you how to make traditional Puerto Rican dishes from the comfort of your kitchen. Chef Benet defines his culinary style as contemporary global cuisine, a concept that combines traditional Puerto Rican ingredients with Japanese, Chinese, Thai, Spanish, Italian, French and Arab influences.

For more information in this virtual Puerto Rican escape on how to participate visit DiscoverPuertoRico.com.

TOPICS: Travel puerto rico san juan virtual party





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Beauty

Women with Control Tummy Control Wide Leg Pants on QVC

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For More Information or to Buy: https://qvc.co/2X00mMc
Women with Control Tummy Control Wide Leg Pants

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Download the Official QVC App: https://qvc.co/qvcapp

About QVC: QVC is powered by storytellers who create delightful shopping experiences through engaging and inspirational content. We bring you daily discoveries through compelling stories, vibrant personalities and personalized content. QVC provides the journey of discovery though an ever-changing collection of familiar and new brands, from home and fashion to beauty, electronics and jewelry.

This previously recorded video may not represent current pricing and availability.

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Deadly Alien Beauty | Cedar Springs Post Newspaper

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Posted on 02 April 2020.

Ranger Steve

By Ranger Steve Mueller

Recently a Cedar Springs Post reader submitted a picture of a deadly beauty (reposted this week). When I first saw the plant in a ditch a few decades ago in front of a home, I thought about planting it by the road at Ody Brook to create a winter visual barrier. It is Phragmites that grow tall. I learned it is a deadly alien beauty.

This photo was taken recently on 22 Mile Road between White Creek Ave and US131 near Sand Lake. Someone painted many of the plumes various colors. Photo taken by Cherri Rose.

The plant hid Moses when he was a baby and saved his life but in our native habitats it is deadly.

Phragmites has a healthy nature niche across the ocean in Egypt but here it is a killer costing a large amount of money, time, and energy from natural resource agencies and volunteers to control it in wetland habitats. 

It is an example of a pandemic species like those I wrote about in last week’s article. Phragmites do not support native species and eliminates them from habitats. It crowds out cattails and other native plants that are residences for many insects supporting Red-winged Blackbirds, Marsh Wrens, and Song Sparrows. Muskrats food and shelter building materials are lost. Minks and otters lose muskrats, fish and crustaceans from their diet. 

This beautiful plant causes significant harm to the wetland ecosystem, causes human economic damage, and interferes with production of a food source many people desire. It reduces fishing opportunities. Phragmites control is completed by a variety methods that include draining wetlands and use of herbicide chemicals. 

The Kent Conservation District (KCD) expends a majority of time, effort, and money assisting farmers and other landowners to manage family property and businesses. Among other work, it supports best practices for agriculture, livestock, and animal waste control to prevent contamination of streams and lakes. It facilitates grants to help families manage woodlots. The additional work necessary to control species like Phragmites that kill massive numbers of native species goes unnoticed by most. KCD helps prevent environmental pandemics. 

The Cedar Springs Public Schools had an actively used outdoor study site along Northland Drive with a portable outdoor classroom. The primary teacher facilitating the program retired and site use diminished. The Kent Conservation District was recently instrumental in controlling Phragmites that established in the ditch along the road and threatened survival of native species on school grounds and the outdoor study site. 

Last week I mentioned there are 180 pandemic exotic species causing havoc in the Great Lakes. Many alien species are doing damage in our yards, communities, and public lands. Much of the native timber harvest comes from land owned by private community members. State and national forests are managed for timber and wildlife resources that support local economies. Preventing establishment of pandemic species is essential work.

Many people do not realize the economic and social impacts of human caused introduction of exotic pandemic species into native habitats. Recent laws, 50 years late, address control of ballast water from ships that release exotics into the Great Lakes. Single focus short term monetary interests, often supported by industry, undermine long term community health and sustainability and negatively impact environmental health supporting us. 

The current coronavirus pandemic onslaught devastating the human economy, social structure, and environment is systematic of occurrences in native ecosystems in our neighborhoods. Most do not have the immediate effect of the virus on people but they threaten the long-term sustainability for our communities for future generations. 

Many people do not embrace the importance of human caused climate change that is driving major problems that will flood continental shorelines to a greater extent than the highwater problems occurring in the Great Lakes. Large cities will be flooded and displaced. This will dwarf the problems caused by the covid-19 outbreak. Better leadership from the president and administration is needed to address climate change and the impact it will have on controlling pandemics.  Our role is to require elected leaders to protect environmental conditions that sustain our communities and family heritage for a healthy future. We need elected leaders to focus on inclusive economic, social, and environmental nature niche sustainability of to insure a healthy future. 

Natural history questions or topic suggestions can be directed to Ranger Steve (Mueller) at odybrook@chartermi.net – Ody Brook Nature Sanctuary, 13010 Northland Dr. Cedar Springs, MI 49319 or call 616-696-1753.

Visit http://cedarspringspost.com/category/outdoors/ranger-steves-nature-niche/ for last week’s article.



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Beauty

doing my makeup for NO REASON ugh

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I love you guys. stay safe and wash ur damn hands

insta-sophiafranciscorso

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