Connect with us

Style

Are we finally ready to talk about colourism? | Yomi Adegoke | Opinion

Published

on


In the past week, two high-profile black women, the author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and the Oscar-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o have spoken candidly about not having experienced racism until they arrived in the United States. Like Adichie, Nyong’o didn’t experience discrimination on the basis of her skin colour per se, but on the basis of how dark she was comparatively. She was a victim of one of the last openly accepted “isms”: colourism, the preferential treatment of lighter-skinned individuals compared with their darker-skinned counterparts.

Nyong’o referred to colourism as “the daughter of racism”, explaining that she was once told at an audition that she was “too dark” for television.

Skin-tone-based prejudice used to be a subject only discussed in whispers within minority communities, but slowly, and thankfully, that is changing. In a recent episode of the hit Channel 4 series Black-ish – Black Like Us – two lead characters discover that the lighting used for their daughter’s school photograph didn’t work on black skin tones, and she has faded into the shadows. Beyoncé’s ode to dark skin on the Lion King soundtrack, Brown Skin Girl, has also helped colourism increase its visibility in the mainstream.

This is a conversation that is still burgeoning – and not always taken seriouslyd. Perhaps that is because colourism is perceived as an intra-community issue for minorities to bicker about among ourselves. After all, the general consensus is that it’s only we who bother with the specificity of shade-based bigotry.

But it bears repeating: colourism is a seed that was planted by white supremacy and watered within our own communities. Its roots still lie very much in the mainstream: the idea that we live on a colour-coded spectrum in which the lighter you are, the whiter (and therefore, better) you are is replicated in wider, whiter society every day.

From the overrepresentation of lighter-skinned actresses in Hollywood to the near-invisibility of dark-skinned female musicians, darker skin is quietly denigrated outside our communities too. It’s no coincidence that several historic “firsts” for the black community were achieved by mixed-raced, fairer individuals: Barack Obama, the first black president of the US; Vanessa Williams, the first black Miss America; Lana Ogilvie, the first black woman to become the face of a non-ethnic cosmetics brand; Halle Berry, the first black woman to win the Academy Award for best actress.

Skin tone affects employability rates, the likelihood of marriage and, most harrowingly, rates of suspension at school. With women’s worth so heavily tied to appearance and lighter skin so heavily tied to beauty standards, it is not surprising that it is usually black women who are hit hardest. The word colourism is believed to have been coined in 1982 by the Pulitzer prize-winner Alice Walker, but it has existed as long as racism has. It must be acknowledged, like any other form of discrimination.





Source

Style

Antthony Boss Lady Techno Stretch Tapered Pant

Published

on

By

Continue Reading

Style

how do madewell jeans fit? / the perfect vintage jean edition

Published

on

By



Ready to meet your dream jeans? Our Perfect Vintage styles have a sky-high rise and an easy tapered leg and come in petite, tall, sizes 23–37, plus plenty of wash options. Yep, they’re best sellers for a reason. https://mdwl.co/31EmkDg

source

Continue Reading

Style

Despite pileup of penalties, Hawks’ Shaw refuses to change scrappy style

Published

on

By


On the second shift of Andrew Shaw’s NHL career, he got into a fight with the Flyers’ Zac Rinaldo.

As soon as the referee dropped the puck to resume play after the Blackhawks had taken a 1-0 lead, Shaw removed his gloves and helmet, and waited for Rinaldo to skate over from the opposite wing.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Shaw landed a vicious right, then absorbed multiple blows from Rinaldo that opened a gaping wound above his right eye.

And just like that, a reputation was born.

The scrappy Shaw quickly became a favorite of coach Joel Quenneville and he ended up playing a vital role in the Hawks’ Stanley Cup championships in 2013 and ’15.

Now in his second stint with the organization that drafted him in the fifth round in 2011, Shaw’s reputation continues to follow — and at times — haunt him.

Both Shaw and coach Jeremy Colliton believe officials are calling penalties against the forward simply because of what Shaw has done in the past. The 28-year-old drew 6 minors in the Hawks’ first six games.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

“It’s something he’s got to be aware of, but I think he’s got a bull’s-eye on him,” Colliton said. “If I go back through all the penalties he’s taken, he probably earned a couple and probably he earned (a couple) like five years ago. So that’s something he’s got to deal with.”

Shaw, however, doesn’t believe he should have to deal with it.

If he commits a penalty, fine.

Call it.

But don’t go looking for something that isn’t there.

“The referees, no matter the history (of) the player, should call the game as it is,” he said before the Hawks hosted Vegas at the United Center on Tuesday. “I mean, yeah, I might have been too vocal in my younger days. But the past three years I’ve been trying to clean it up a little bit.

“I just take my penalties when I get ’em. But I must have dug myself a really deep hole. (Just) trying to climb out of it since.”

Heading into Tuesday, the Hawks had killed off 5 of Shaw’s 6 penalties (although the Flyers scored with Shaw in the box while skating 4-on-4 in the season opener). He wasn’t happy with any of the last three calls — a holding penalty against Washington’s Nick Jensen; a hooking call on Columbus’ Alexander Wennberg; and an interference call on the Blue Jackets’ Pierre-Luc Dubois.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

One thing’s for sure, though — Shaw isn’t going to change how he plays. He’s still going to deliver huge, crunching hits. He’ll remain a pest in front of the opponent’s goalie. And he’s going to continue to stick up for his teammates.

“I find if I’m not playing on the edge, I’m not playing great,” Shaw said. “I need to play physical. Even in preseason, I was just finishing checks — clean, shoulder-to-shoulder — and was getting penalty after penalty.

“Hockey still is a physical game. There’s still hitting. It’s still legal. So I’m going to go out there and play hard; make it hard on my opponents.”

In other words, The Mutt’s gonna keeping coming.

“Not going to change who I am now,” Shaw said, then added with a wry smile: “I’m an old dog.”

• Twitter: @johndietzdh

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        





Source

Continue Reading

Trending

We use cookies in order to give you the best possible experience on our website. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies.
Accept